Archives for Recipe Roundup

How to absorb the most minerals from your bone broth (plus my recipe)

  You’ve probably heard of one of the biggest health trends now: Bone Broth. Not only is it an easily made inexpensive traditional food, but you can buy it pre-made in cans, boullions, frozen, or fresh; and now you can even get a powdered version!  (Not sure how I feel about that one) It’s true that bone broth can have a lot of nutrients, including minerals, but you may not be getting as much as you’ve been led to believe. At the end of this post you will find my recipe for bone broth/chicken soup that is: maximized for mineral absorption; packed with veggies; AND (and this is the most important point IMO) is requested by my 7-year-old!  She loves it, and that makes it quite likely that your family will like it too.  🙂 Did I forget to say it’s also oh SO very easy to prepare? And, as with all posts written by a science-based holistic nutritionist (me!), you’ll get the un-branded and un-biased science that goes along with it!  🙂 The science of bone broth   Scientifically speaking, bone broth is awesome!  🙂 Bone broth is easy to make, uses parts of the animal that are typically thrown away (thus making a second meal from that one single chicken), and contains several nutrients including minerals & amino acids.(1) In general, there are two things you can do to get the most nutrients from your foods: Eat the foods with the highest levels of those nutrients; Increase the “bioavailability” of those nutrients, so they’re more easily absorbed into your body from that food.(2) One great thing about bone broth is that you don’t lose many of nutrients that leach out of the foods while cooking it, because you will actually drink the water it was cooked in.(3) There are
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Medical Marijuana and Cannabinoids (and hemp seed recipes)

  I’m very happy to be contributing to the Fibromyalgia Summit Wellness Bundle.  The summit will be online for free May 12-14 2016; and available for purchase until May 25.  Click here to register: If you’d like a nicely put together summary of the medical research on marijuana for pain, you can check out my e-book here: Find out more about the book here, or you can buy it for CAD$7.00 right here: Medical Marijuana and Cannabinoids (and hemp seed recipes)   Marijuana and Cannabis   Cannabis sativa and cannabis indica are very versatile plants.  They have been used for thousands of years, not only for medicinal, religious or “euphoric” reasons, but also to make fabrics and eat the seeds (I love hemp seeds – see recipes at the bottom!).  The ancient cultures most known for cannabis use are Chinese and Hindu (the plant is indigenous to Central and South Asia); as well as Greek and Middle Eastern.  Within the last few hundred years, it reached the rest of Europe, as well as North America.(1) Use of the cannabis plant has been recommended by physicians and medical texts throughout the ages.  A few of the traditional medicinal uses have been for chronic pain, seizures, spasticity, and nausea.(1) Cannabinoids (the active compounds) from the plant were identified in the 1960s, particularly delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) which is the psychoactive compound in the plant (no psychoactive or medicinal properties in the delicious and nutritious hemp seeds, sorry…).(1) In the following years, concerns grew about addiction and other side effects, and cannabis’ medicinal value was questioned; which lead to legal issues.  However, there were always anecdotal reports of marijuana’s ability to help with many health concerns such as glaucoma and nausea/vomiting of chemotherapy.(1) Note that from a strictly scientific perspective, anecdotes are interesting and can be a reason to begin researching something, but are not considered
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100 stealth ways to drink less alcohol at parties

        100 Stealth ways to drink less alcohol at parties   Now, I’m not opposed to small-to-moderate alcohol intake.  I’ll share a glass of wine with my husband a couple of nights a week, and often have a beer with my Friday night pizza (Gasp!  Yes, we have a weekly pizza night with our girls). 😉 But, we all know that alcohol is not particularly healthy.  A moderate amount can have some health benefits for some people, but overdoing it is not good for anyone.  Right? There is A LOT of good information out there on the effects of alcohol consumption on your health.  In fact, references 1, 2, 3 & 4 listed below are great reads if you’d like to “geek out” on the health effects of alcohol. At the end of the day, the health effects of alcohol range from “probably good” to “absolutely disastrous.”(1) And there are many reasons why you might want to reduce (or eliminate) your alcohol intake this holiday season.  Or any time. Any alcohol consumption above low to moderate levels can displace nutrients, increase health risks, and make you act like a degenerate at parties.(2) For me, growing up with an Eastern European heritage, alcohol was part of every celebration.  Yup, EVERY celebration.  And as soon as we were adults we were allowed to participate. As an example, the receiving line at my wedding was basically to invite every guest to do a “shot” with one of the bridal party members. Why would I want to drink less alcohol at parties?   Having said that, there were lots of times in my life when I chose not to drink. The most obvious is when I was (or thought I might be) pregnant.  There were also times when I wanted to keep my wits about me, especially
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Foods vs. Supplements: The Turmeric vs. Curcumin Edition

            Turmeric vs. Curcumin   OK – you’ve probably heard of turmeric. It’s been touted all over the “health waves” recently to be helpful for all sorts of diseases. Got pain?  Have some turmeric. What about cancer?  Have some turmeric. Diabetes?  Have some turmeric. And the list goes on… You probably also know it’s the golden coloured powder in curry spices. You may even enjoy eating curry (I do!). BUT, what if you don’t like it? (Oh, the horror!) 🙂   Turmeric: It’s NOT Just for Curry Anymore…100+ ways to eat turmeric!   You may wonder: Does it work? Should I supplement? Should I eat it? And most important of all: “If I should eat it and DON’T like curry, how the heck can I even consider it?” Great questions! (If you want to skip the answers to these questions and go straight to the recipes, just scroll down the page a bit)   Click here to download a handy comparison chart of Turmeric vs Curcumin!     What is turmeric and what does it do?   Turmeric is a spice, and it’s not a “spicy-hot” strong-flavoured spice either. I personally find the strength (not the flavour) to be similar to ginger. Turmeric is a rhizome (1) called curcuma longa that is dried and ground to make turmeric powder. It’s an herb that has been traditionally used for medical purposes in several Asian countries(2). The main and most studied ‘active ingredient’ in turmeric (3) is called curcumin, which makes up less than 7% of the dried weight of the spice. Curcumin supplements have been shown in many, many scientific studies to have anti-inflammatory (2,4), anti-oxidant (2), anti-cancer (2,5), and pain-relieving effects. It is also being studied to protect your brain and heart (2), as well as to prevent and reduce the side-effects of diabetes (2,6). It has been studied for dozens and dozens of other health uses – check out the table in this link. It is fat-soluble and not well absorbed from your gut(2), and it seems to be quite safe for most people even at higher doses (see “Foods vs. Supplements” below).  If you want to actually absorb the curcumin
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