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Why we should all be lifting weights

I know you may not want to be a body builder (it’s awesome if you do, though), but that’s not what I’m talking about here!

Nor do you have to join a gym.

Nor buy super-fancy equipment.

Want to know why I recommend lifting weights (a.k.a. “resistance training”) for people of all ages?

If you’re under the age of 50 it’s important to have a good muscle mass because we start to lose up to 1% muscle mass per year after that. That’s up to 30% loss by the time you’re 80!

And you can lose your muscle strength even faster than 1% per year.

So, the more muscle mass you have before age 50, the better off you’ll be.

If you’re over the age of 50, the more you lift weights, the slower your rate of loss will be. Why settle for 1% loss, when you can keep your strength even longer?

So you can have more muscle AND slow down the rate of muscle loss by lifting weights at all ages.

Lifting weights is not just about muscle “mass” and “strength” though. It’s a great way to maintain good health for just about everyone at any age, whether you’re athletic or not.

What exactly do I mean by “good health”?

Here are five key health factors that are improved with increased muscle mass.

REASON #1 – BOOST YOUR METABOLISM

REFERENCES

Ciolac, E.G. & Rodrigues-da-Silva, J.M. (2016). Resistance Training as a Tool for Preventing and Treating Musculoskeletal Disorders. Sports Med, 46(9):1239-48.

LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26914266

McLeod, M., Breen, L., Hamilton, D.L. & Philp, A. (2016). Live strong and prosper: the importance of skeletal muscle strength for healthy ageing. Biogerontology. 2016; 17: 497–510.

LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4889643/

Perkin, O., McGuigan, P., Thompson, D., & Stokes, K. (2016). A reduced activity model: a relevant tool for the study of ageing muscle. Biogerontology. 2016; 17: 435–447.

LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4889637/

Rudrappa, S.S., Wilkinson, D.J., Greenhaff, P.L., Smith, K., Idris, I. and Atherton, P.J. (2016). Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance—A Qualitative Review. Front Physiol. 2016; 7: 361.

LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4997013/

Wullems, J.A., Verschueren, S.M.P., Degens, H., Morse, C.I & Onambélé, G.L. (2016). A review of the assessment and prevalence of sedentarism in older adults, its physiology/health impact and non-exercise mobility counter-measures. Biogerontology. 2016; 17: 547–565.

LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4889631/

Xu, J., Lombardi, G., Jiao, W. & Banfi, G. Effects of Exercise on Bone Status in Female Subjects, from Young Girls to Postmenopausal Women: An Overview of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. Sports Med. 2016 Aug;46(8):1165-82.

LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26856338