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Clients and patients want to feel well and live a disease-free life, right?

A recent study reviewed a bunch of studies on the links between ultra-processed foods, excess weight, and chronic disease risk, and confirmed these links!

Lower ultra-processed food consumption reduces these risks—and it doesn’t have to be that hard to do.

Introducing a done-for-you pre-written Health scoop (new study update) to share this information with your clients and patients along with a few practical tips.

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Product Details:

Document Type: MS Word

Release Date: April 2022

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Effortlessly send your email subscribers updated new health information with practical tips each week without having to create something brand new from scratch.

This Health scoop (new study update) was created to help you consistently stay in touch with your audience while keeping you up-to-date with some of the most fascinating recent studies and includes:

  • A short primer for your clients on what ultra-processed foods are

  • How this study confirms the links between people who eat more ultra-processed foods, weight gain, and risk for several chronic diseases

  • A list of possible mechanisms to help explain *how* ultra-processed foods negatively affect health
  • Several tips to help your audience choose less processed foods more often (and spots to link to your recipes, meal plans, and other content to help your audience and establish your credibility even more)

Consistently provide valuable, research-based health content to your audience without spending the time and effort to do the research and writing yourself.

Price: US$37

Easy-to-understand study summary with some practical strategies and tips for your clients

Buy 3 Health scoops or articles, get 1 free!

*** Discount is automatically applied at checkout when you have 4 in your cart ***

NOTE: This Health scoop mini-article has natural links to:

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Customizable health study summary with practical tips

Release the pressure to create new health content every week and share study summaries and tips with your email subscribers and/or social media followers
Price: US$37

Related topics: Ultra-processed foods; minimally processed foods; weight; chronic disease

Backgrounder articles: Links to articles on ultra-processed foods, trans fats, and how to reduce intake of processed foods

Study design: Review of several studies that looked at ultra-processed foods, weight, and disease risk

Image options: 10 related image links included (5 groups of 2 images: 1 processed food + 1 of its unprocessed equivalent)

Subject line options (choose your favourite or A/B test two): 4 different subject lines included

Customization tips: 6 customization tips included

Email/Mini article: The easy-to-understand study update is included along with several tips on how to reduce intake of ultra-processed foods and drinks and several ideas on where to link to your own related recipes, meal plans, or other content

Plus, a few more suggestions on what to add to your email newsletter after this Health scoop (new study update) to make it more than just educational, but also to build trust and market your health practice.

You have the flexibility to turn this done-for-you Health scoop (new study update) into any and all of these:

  • One epic email newsletter or several social media posts with easy-to-understand health information and a couple of strategies and tips for your readers to easily implement that knowledge to improve their health.
  • A customizable mini-article to post on your blog.
  • A foundation to record a short-but-sweet science-backed, trust-building video, podcast episode, or social post talking about the fascinating new study.

*Please don’t re-sell or distribute this Health scoop to other healthcare professionals or anyone else for their business/commercial use or in any way that earns them money or marks/grades/credits for their education. Please don’t submit it anywhere else as your own (i.e., as a guest post or to your school). NOTE: By purchasing this mini-article, you are the only one granted a limited license to use it (and there are only 73 licenses).

Want a sneak peek of a free sample of a Health scoop (new study update), but on a different topic?

Click to view the reference for this Health scoop

Crimarco, A., Landry, M. J., & Gardner, C. D. (2021). Ultra-processed Foods, Weight Gain, and Co-morbidity Risk. Current obesity reports, 1–13. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13679-021-00460-y

About the study (these details aren’t included in the client/patient-friendly Scoop, it’s for your info as a research-based health professional):

  • The purpose of this study was to review studies published between 2016-2021 that looked at the links between ultra-processed food consumption and weight gain and/or risks of other diseases. The researchers included several studies published around the world, as you can see in the tables linked below: 
    • https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13679-021-00460-y/tables/1
    • https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13679-021-00460-y/tables/3
  • “It is worth noting that obesity is a multifactorial disease with many related lifestyle contributors. Given the majority of research on UPFs is observational in nature, residual confounding is possible.” This means that there is a link between the intake of ultra-processed foods and obesity, but the way the studies were done (i.e., they’re observational), they can’t definitively prove that the consumption of ultra-processed foods *caused* excess weight and/or diseases. Plus, we know that obesity is a complex disease that involves many factors, one of which is the consumption of ultra-processed foods (i.e., can also include factors such as genetics, levels of physical activity, other diseases/mobility issues, medications, mental health, socio-economic status, difficulty accessing fresh foods, etc.)
  • When I mention the “increased rates” in percentages, this means that people who eat more ultra-processed foods have a higher risk of getting that condition. For example, “overweight (27-36% higher)” means that for every 100 people with overweight who do not eat a lot of ultra-processed foods, you will have 127-136 people with overweight who do eat a lot of ultra-processed foods. So the risk increases by 27-36%. 
  • Conclusion: “While awaiting further research, recommendations to limit or restrict UPF [ultra-processed food] consumption would likely lead to more benefit than harm.”
  • Note that all studies have limitations. This study is a review of many studies published in the past 5 years on the topic of ultra-processed foods and weight and/or disease risk. This makes it a strong study. However, as noted above, most of the research it includes is “observational” not “experimental” for the simple fact that experimental nutrition studies are very difficult and expensive to conduct. Plus, nutrition studies are difficult—but not impossible—to “blind” (e.g., people know whether they’re eating broccoli or fries, but they may not know if they’re eating a high- or low-sodium diet). This means that this review of several studies is another pretty strong piece in the puzzle linking ultra-processed foods to excess weight and chronic diseases, but does *not* confirm that one “causes” the other (and as mentioned above, we *know* that there are other factors involved, like genes).
  • Therefore, we can’t say that eating more ultra-processed foods *causes* weight gain or chronic diseases, we can say that it increases risk/chances or it’s associated with an increased risk/chance (correlation does not equal causation). Here’s a blog post I wrote on this concept: https://leesaklich.com/health-research/correlation-does-not-equal-causation/
  • Study strength is rated a 7/7 according to this chart (review of several studies, but note that many of the studies included are rated at a 4/7 or 5/7): https://www.compoundchem.com/2015/04/09/scientific-evidence/ 

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Price: US$37

Easy-to-understand study summary with some practical strategies and tips for your clients

Buy 3 Health scoops or articles, get 1 free!

*** Discount is automatically applied at checkout when you have 4 in your cart ***

NOTE: This Health scoop mini-article has natural links to:

Click here to shop for articles.

This Health scoop has natural links to:

$37.00

Mini-article to share with your email subscribers

Click here for preview

Add to cart

$37.00

Mini-article to share with your email subscribers

Click here for preview

Add to cart

3,653 words in 2 parts - 14 scientific references

Click here for preview

Add to cart