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Clients and patients want to know how to live a long and healthy life, right? But, what is the best advice when it comes to nutrients (according to science)?

A recent study followed 48,762 participants (nurses) over decades. The researchers found a trend linked to people who maintained good physical function and cognitive health, and were free from chronic diseases and mental illness!

There is one macronutrient in particular that seemed to be linked to healthier aging. That macronutrient is protein.

Introducing a done-for-you pre-written Health scoop (new study update) to share this information with your audience, clients, and patients, along with a few practical tips.

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Product Details:

Document Type: MS Word

Release Date: March 2024

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Effortlessly send your email subscribers, social media followers, and other members of your audience updated new health information and practical tips without having to research and create brand new content from scratch.

This Health scoop (new study update) was created to help you consistently stay in touch with your audience while keeping you up-to-date with some of the most fascinating recent studies and includes:

  • A short primer for your clients on the importance of nutrition for their health and longevity

  • How this (huge) study was able to see a clear link between healthy aging and protein intake (and the different types of protein).
  • A list of high-protein foods.

Consistently provide valuable, new, research-based health content to your audience so that you become their preferred expert and go-to health professional.

Price: US$37

Easy-to-understand study summary with some practical strategies and tips for your clients

Buy 3 Health scoops or articles, get 1 free!

*** Discount is automatically applied at checkout when you have 4 in your cart ***

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Customizable health study summary with practical tips

Release the pressure to create new health content every week and share study summaries and tips with your email subscribers and/or social media followers
Price: US$37

Related topics: Longevity, protein, nutrition, plant-based, physical health, mental health

Backrounder article: Link to a Medscape article summarizing this study

Study design: This is a large observational study (Nurses Health Study) that followed 48,762 people for 30 years.

Image options: 11 related image links included

Subject line options (choose your favourite or A/B test two): 7 different subject lines included; plus 6 options to use as email preview text

Customization tips: 8 customization tips included

Email: The easy-to-understand new study update is included along with a “minimum protein intake” calculation and a list of higher protein foods (animal and plant-based)

Plus, a few more suggestions on what to add to your email newsletter after this Health scoop (new study update) to make it more than just educational, but also to build trust, market your health practice, and even sell some of your products or services.

You have the flexibility to turn this done-for-you Health scoop (new study update) into any and all of these:

  • One epic email newsletter or several social media posts with easy-to-understand health information and a couple of strategies and tips for your readers to easily implement that knowledge to improve their health.
  • A foundation to record a short-but-sweet science-backed trust-building video, podcast episode, or social post talking about the fascinating new study.

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  • This is a large observational study (Nurses Health Study) that looked at 48,762 people who were <60 years old in 1984. They looked at participants’ intakes of total protein, animal protein, dairy protein (a subset of animal protein), and plant protein at midlife (in 1984) to see if, after 30 years, they were free from 11 major chronic diseases, have good mental health, and don’t have impairments in either cognitive or physical function.
    • “Diet is an important modifiable factor of several chronic diseases, frailty, premature death, and successful or healthy aging.”
    • “In particular, protein intake plays an important role in maintaining good health status in older adults,” by
      • improving physical performance
      • maintaining physical mobility and cognitive function
      • reducing muscle loss, risk of hip fractures, and loss of bone density

    Those 11 chronic diseases the researchers looked at in this study were:

    • cancer
    • type-2 diabetes
    • myocardial infarction
    • coronary artery bypass graft surgery or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty
    • congestive heart failure
    • stroke
    • kidney failure
    • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
    • Parkinson disease
    • multiple sclerosis
    • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Here’s what the researchers conclude:

    • “Dietary protein intake, especially plant protein, in midlife, is associated with higher odds of healthy aging and with several domains of positive health status in a large cohort of female nurses.”
    • “In our study, dietary protein was favorably associated with physical function in older age, and this relationship was stronger for plant protein.”

    Why does plant protein seem to have an edge over animal-based protein when it comes to aging healthfully?

    • Not 100% sure, but could be related to
      • “Reduced risk factors of cardiometabolic diseases, such as reduced LDL cholesterol, lower blood pressure, and insulin sensitivity, and decreased levels of proinflammatory markers.”
      • “We also note that although all protein sources were associated with better odds of healthy aging, dietary components related to plant protein sources, including dietary fiber, micronutrients, and polyphenols, may have contributed to the stronger associations observed for plant protein.”


    In other words, eating protein in midlife (under age 60) sets you up for a healthier older life (age 70-93). This is true for all protein intake, and the health benefits seem to be a bit stronger for plant-based protein intake.

    Note from Leesa: This study did not look at any treatments or cures for current conditions. Instead, it’s found that protein intake in midlife reduces risk for many diseases in the older years.

    Study strength

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Price: US$37

Easy-to-understand study summary with some practical strategies and tips for your clients

Buy 3 Health scoops or articles, get 1 free!

*** Discount is automatically applied at checkout when you have 4 in your cart ***

NOTE: This Health scoop has natural links to:

Click here to shop for articles.

This Health scoop has natural links to:

2021 Aug Longevity diet

$37.00

Pre-written mini-article to customize and share





Click here for preview

Inflammaging article

3,787 words in 2 parts – 27 references





Click here for preview

Sustainable food article

3,494 words in 3 parts – 28 references





Click here for preview