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Probiotics for moods and stress
done-for-you health article probiotics gone forever dec 2019

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Document Type: MS Word

Word Count: 1,271 words

# of References: 18

Release Date: Apr 5, 2017

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Probiotics for Moods and Stress? Yes!

What do you do when your mood is off or you’re stressed to the max?

Eat ice cream? Binge watch Netflix? Call your bestie?

After reading this article, you may consider yogurt, a handful of walnuts, or maybe even some dark chocolate as your go-to mood-boosters and stress-busters.

Today, we’ll unpack some of the exciting (and preliminary) new research about the link between your gut health and moods/stress.

We’ll talk about your friendly resident gut microbes (mostly bacteria), probiotic foods and supplements, as well as foods to feed those gut microbes and probiotics (aka “prebiotics”).

WHAT THE HECK ARE “GUT MICROBES?”

Oh, our friendly “gut microbes.”

They are the trillions of microbes that happily live in our gut. They help us by digesting foods, making vitamins, and even protecting us from the not-so-friendly microbes that may get in there.

Believe it or not, these friendly microbes have mood-boosting and stress-busting functions too!

FUN FACT: There are more microbes inside our gut, than all of the human cells that make us. Yup, we’re more than half microbe! So, how can they NOT impact our health?

Subsections in the article:

  • GUT MICROBES AND PROBIOTICS
  • BAD MOODS/STRESS CAN MEAN BAD MICROBES
  • BAD MICROBES CAN MEAN BAD MOODS
  • HOW IS THIS GUT-BRAIN CONNECTION POSSIBLE?
  • HOW TO NURTURE HEALTHY GUT MICROBES – PROBIOTICS
  • HOW TO NURTURE HEALTHY GUT MICROBES – PREBIOTICS
  • CONCLUSION

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(Regular price $47; Will be discontinued Dec 2019)

1,271 words – 18 scientific references

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