‘Done for you’ pre-written blog post
Instantly download the entire 2217 word post (12 refs) and upload to your website (Here is the introduction and references):

 

How Stress Hormones Keep You From Your Weight Loss Goals

 

You probably wouldn’t be surprised to know that more stress and stress hormones promote weight gain, would you?

But what exactly is stress, and how does it keep you from your weight loss goals?

In fact, there are actually many links between stress hormones and weight.  We’ll talk about six major reasons how stress hormones keep you from your weight loss goals. These include the effect stress has on digestion and gut health, inflammation and the immune system. Stress can cause cravings, increased appetite, and “stress eating.” It can promote fat storage around the waist with its effect on insulin sensitivity. Stress can also be mood-busting and de-motivating, not to mention how it worsens sleep.

All of these can work to keep you from your weight loss goals.

Let’s go over the effects of stress and stress hormones, and exactly how they all tie into weight loss. Then we’ll end off with two strategies (and several of my best tips) how to manage stress.

Because, as you know, weight loss isn’t just about calories.

 

WHAT IS STRESS?

 

When you hear the word “stress” do you think it’s dangerous or unhealthy?

In actual fact, stress itself is a totally normal response to a sense of danger. It can be your friend or foe.

You usually can’t fully control it. It’s your body’s way of protecting you with the “fight or flight” reaction. It can help you survive.

SYMPTOMS OF STRESS

STRESS RESPONSE – NERVES AND HORMONES

STRESS HORMONES

STRESS HORMONES AND WEIGHT

1 – Poor Digestion and Gut Health

2 – Inflammation and immune system dysregulation

3 – Cravings, increased appetite, and “stress eating”

4 – Insulin sensitivity

5 – Mood-busting and de-motivating

6 – Negatively affects sleep

STRESS-REDUCING TIPS

SUMMARY

REFERENCES

 

Brzozowski B, Mazur-Bialy A, Pajdo R, Kwiecien S, Bilski J, Zwolinska-Wcislo M, Mach T, Brzozowski T. Mechanisms by which Stress Affects the Experimental and Clinical Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): Role of Brain-Gut Axis. Curr Neuropharmacol. 2016;14(8):892-900.
LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27040468

Chao AM, Jastreboff AM, White MA, Grilo CM, Sinha R. Stress, cortisol, and other appetite-related hormones: Prospective prediction of 6-month changes in food cravings and weight. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2017 Apr;25(4):713-720. doi: 10.1002/oby.21790.
LINK:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.21790/full

Chen WQ, Zhao XL, Hou Y, Li ST, Hong Y, Wang DL, & Cheng YY. Protective effects of green tea polyphenols on cognitive impairments induced by psychological stress in rats. Behav Brain Res. 2009 Aug 24;202(1):71-6.
LINK:  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016643280900165X

Clarke G, Stilling RM, Kennedy PJ, Stanton C, Cryan JF, & Dinan TG. Minireview: Gut microbiota: the neglected endocrine organ. Mol Endocrinol. 2014 Aug;28(8):1221-38. doi: 10.1210/me.2014-1108.
LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24892638

Fernandez-Rodriguez E, Stewart PM & Cooper MS. The pituitary–adrenal axis and body composition. Pituitary 12 (2009):105–115 DOI 10.1007/s11102-008-0098-2
LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18324475

Hewagalamulage SD., Lee TK., Clarke IJ. & Henry BA. Stress, cortisol, and obesity: a role for cortisol responsiveness in identifying individuals prone to obesity. Domest Anim Endocrinol. 2016;56 Suppl:S112-20. doi: 10.1016/j.domaniend.2016.03.004.
LINK:  http://www.domesticanimalendo.com/article/S0739-7240(16)30034-0/abstract

Incollingo Rodriguez AC, Epel ES, White ML, Standen EC, Seckl JR & Tomiyama AJ. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation and cortisol activity in obesity: A systematic review. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2015 Dec;62:301-18. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2015.08.014.
LINK:  http://www.psyneuen-journal.com/article/S0306-4530(15)00887-2/abstract

Kolbe, I., Dumbell, R. & Oster, H. (2015). Circadian Clocks and the Interaction between Stress Axis and Adipose Function. Int J Endocrinol. 2015:693204. doi: 10.1155/2015/693204.
LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4426660/

Lucassen EA, Cizza G. The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis, Obesity, and Chronic Stress Exposure: Sleep and the HPA Axis in Obesity. Curr Obes Rep. 2012 Dec;1(4):208-215.
LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3498460/?report=reader

Michopoulos V. Stress-induced alterations in estradiol sensitivity increase risk for obesity in women. Physiol Behav. 2016;166:56-64. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.05.016.
LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27182047

Pasquali R, Vicennati V, Cacciari M & Pagotto U. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Annual NY Academic Science, 1083, 2006;111–128. doi: 10.1196/annals.1367.009
LINK:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1196/annals.1367.009/pdf

Schorr M, Lawson EA, Dichtel LE, Klibanski A, Miller KK. Cortisol Measures Across the Weight Spectrum. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Sep;100(9):3313-21. doi: 10.1210/JC.2015-2078.
LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4570173/