Instantly download the entire 2355 word post (23 refs) and upload to your website: Intermittent fasting - Not just for weight loss

‘Done for you’ pre-written blog post Instantly download the entire 3001 word post (17 refs) and upload to your website (Here is the introduction, subheadings, and references): Leaky gut, autoimmunity, and mental health - What are the links? The gut (a.k.a. digestive tract) is not just a tube that absorbs nutrients and gets rid of waste - it’s a complex alive system that’s a huge foundation of health. And not just gut health, but the overall health of our bodies and minds. We know how important it is to get all of our essential nutrients from food - and this is a big part of what our digestive tract does. But, there is way more to the story than just that. When the gut is not working properly, symptoms can appear. Yes, typical gut and abdominal symptoms, but also other seemingly unrelated symptoms. Did you know that things like allergies, autoimmunity, and mental health have been linked with gut problems? Let’s look at one gut problem in particular (you may have heard about this lately) - leaky gut. This literally involves tiny “leaks” in our gut lining that can allow more than just needed nutrients and water into our bodies. Researchers are looking at this, and I want to share the latest with you, as well as give you some helpful strategies to optimize your gut health, for overall health! What is “leaky gut” linked with? ... Gut structure - Three layers of our gut lining ... Leaky gut and our gut microbes ... Leaky gut, allergies, and autoimmunity ... Leaky gut and mental health ... What you can do about leaky gut ... Conclusion Leaky gut, or “intestinal permeability” is linked with many conditions of the gut, the body, and the mind. While research is still figuring out exactly how this happens and what comes first, there are definitely steps you can take today to help optimize your health. Eat more whole, unprocessed foods, and ditch ultra-processed foods. Reduce alcohol consumption and consider probiotics. And, if you think you may have a food intolerance, be sure to speak with your healthcare professional. References Aguayo-Patrón, S. V., & Calderón de la Barca, A. M. (2017). Old Fashioned vs. Ultra-Processed-Based Current Diets: Possible Implication in the Increased Susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease in Childhood. Foods, 6(11), 100. http://doi.org/10.3390/foods6110100 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5704144/ Brzozowski, B., Mazur-Bialy, A., Pajdo, R., Kwiecien, S., Bilski, J., Zwolinska-Wcislo, M., … Brzozowski, T. (2016). Mechanisms by which Stress Affects the Experimental and Clinical Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): Role of Brain-Gut Axis. Current Neuropharmacology, 14(8), 892–900. http://doi.org/10.2174/1570159X14666160404124127 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5333596/ Fasano A. (2011). Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Physiol Rev. 91(1):151-75. doi: 10.1152/physrev.00003.2008. LINK:  https://www.physiology.org/doi/pdf/10.1152/physrev.00003.2008 Holtmann G, Shah A, Morrison M. (2017). Pathophysiology of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Holistic Overview. Dig Dis, 35 Suppl 1:5-13. doi: 10.1159/000485409. LINK:  https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/485409 Holzer, P., Farzi, A., Hassan, A. M., Zenz, G., Jačan, A., & Reichmann, F. (2017). Visceral Inflammation and Immune Activation Stress the Brain. Frontiers in Immunology, 8, 1613. http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.01613 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5702648/ Kelly, J. R., Kennedy, P. J., Cryan, J. F., Dinan, T. G., Clarke, G., & Hyland, N. P. (2015). Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders. Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, 9, 392. http://doi.org/10.3389/fncel.2015.00392 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4604320/ Lamprecht, M., Bogner, S., Schippinger, G., Steinbauer, K., Fankhauser, F., Hallstroem, S., … Greilberger, J. F. (2012). Probiotic supplementation affects markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation, and inflammation in trained men; a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 9, 45. http://doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-9-45  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3465223/ Lerner, A & Matthias, T. (2015). Changes in intestinal tight junction permeability associated with industrial food additives explain the rising incidence of autoimmune disease. Autoimmun Rev, 14(6):479-89. doi: 10.1016/j.autrev.2015.01.009. LINK:  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1568997215000245?via%3Dihub Lerner, A., Neidhöfer, S., & Matthias, T. (2017). The Gut Microbiome Feelings of the Brain: A Perspective for Non-Microbiologists. Microorganisms, 5(4), 66. http://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms5040066  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5748575/ Mu, Q., Kirby, J., Reilly, C. M., & Luo, X. M. (2017). Leaky Gut As a Danger Signal for Autoimmune Diseases. Frontiers in Immunology, 8, 598. http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.00598  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5440529/ Slyepchenko, A., Maes, M., Jacka, F.N., Köhler, C.A., Barichello, T., McIntyre, R.S., Berk, M., Grande, I., Foster, J.A., Vieta, E. & Carvalho, A.F. (2017). Gut Microbiota, Bacterial Translocation, and Interactions with Diet: Pathophysiological Links between Major Depressive Disorder and Non-Communicable Medical Comorbidities. Psychother Psychosom, 86(1):31-46. LINK:  https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/448957 Sturgeon, C., & Fasano, A. (2016). Zonulin, a regulator of epithelial and endothelial barrier functions, and its involvement in chronic inflammatory diseases. Tissue Barriers, 4(4), e1251384. http://doi.org/10.1080/21688370.2016.1251384  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5214347/ Wikipedia. Bacteroidetes. Accessed May 22, 2018. LINK:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacteroidetes Wikipedia. Firmicutes. Accessed May 22, 2018. LINK:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firmicutes Wilms, E., Gerritsen, J., Smidt, H., Besseling-van der Vaart, I., Rijkers, G. T., Garcia Fuentes, A. R., … Troost, F. J. (2016). Effects of Supplementation of the Synbiotic Ecologic® 825/FOS P6 on Intestinal Barrier Function in Healthy Humans: A Randomized Controlled Trial. PLoS ONE, 11(12), e0167775. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0167775  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5147956/ World Health Organization, Food and Agriculture Organization. Probiotics. Accessed May 22, 2018. LINK:  http://www.fao.org/food/food-safety-quality/a-z-index/probiotics/en/ Xiao, L., van’t Land, B., van de Worp, W. R. P. H., Stahl, B., Folkerts, G., & Garssen, J. (2017). Early-Life Nutritional Factors and Mucosal Immunity in the Development of Autoimmune Diabetes. Frontiers in Immunology, 8, 1219. http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.01219  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5626949/   ***NOTE: YOU GET 25% OFF WHEN YOU BUY FOUR ARTICLES***

‘Done for you’ pre-written blog post Instantly download the entire 2676 word post (22 refs) and upload to your website (Here is the introduction, subheadings, and references): Mental Health: The Neurotransmitter Edition Brain and mental health concerns affect a huge number of people. But, where does it all come from? Does it start, or continue, because of the way the brain and nervous system is working? Some of it is genetic, passed down from our families. Some of it is triggered by stress and/or traumatic life events. Many times it seems to be related to “brain chemicals” called neurotransmitters. And, most likely, it’s a complex combination of many of these, plus other factors! Today we’re talking neurotransmitters and their roles in mental health for stress and mood. Plus, I’ll let you in on what doesn’t work, as well as one major thing you can do to help to boost your brain health, mental health (and neurotransmitters)! Neuro-what? (Neurotransmitters) ... How Neurotransmitters Work ... Key Neurotransmitters ... Key Neurotransmitter #1 - Serotonin (“happy”) ... Key Neurotransmitter #2 - Norepinephrine (NE) (“alertness” and “stress”) ... Key Neurotransmitter #3 - Dopamine (DA) (“motivation” and “behaviour”) ... Neurotransmitters and Stress ... Neurotransmitters and Mental Health ... Foods, Supplements and your Neurotransmitters ... Foods and Supplements for Serotonin? ... Exercise for Brain and Mental Health ... Exercise and Your Neurotransmitters ... Conclusion Neurotransmitters are key chemicals our neurons use to communicate with each other. They are made from amino acids and are essential for optimal brain and mental health. Eating and supplementing with key amino acids may not do much - but something else does. That is: regular exercise! Regular exercise is a way to help boost our moods and ability to think and remember well. Exercise does this through improving the blood and oxygen flow to the brain, stimulation of our brains’ ability to change itself, as well as has positive effects on brain chemicals including neurotransmitters. NOTE: If you think you may have any brain or mental illness, please see your licensed healthcare professional. References: Belujon, P., & Grace, A. A. (2015). Regulation of dopamine system responsivity and its adaptive and pathological response to stress. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282(1805), 20142516. http://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.2516  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4389605/ Belujon, P., & Grace, A.A. (2017). Dopamine System Dysregulation in Major Depressive Disorders. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 20(12), 1036–1046. http://doi.org/10.1093/ijnp/pyx056 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5716179/ Chand, S.P. and Whitten, R.A. (2018) Depression. StatPearls Publishing. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK430847/ Clevenger, S. S., Malhotra, D., Dang, J., Vanle, B., & IsHak, W. W. (2018). The role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in preventing relapse of major depressive disorder. Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology, 8(1), 49–58. http://doi.org/10.1177/2045125317737264  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5761909/ Cooney, G.M., Dwan, K., Greig, C.A., Lawlor, D.A., Rimer, J., Waugh, F.R., McMurdo, M. & Mead, G.E. (2013). Exercise for depression. Cochrane Database Syst Rev, (9):CD004366. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004366.pub6. LINK:  http://cochranelibrary-wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD004366.pub6/abstract Examine.com. Supplements: 5-HTP. Accessed May 7, 2018. LINK:  https://examine.com/supplements/5-htp/ Examine.com. Supplements: Branched-chain amino acids. Accessed May 7, 2018. LINK:  https://examine.com/supplements/branched-chain-amino-acids/ Examine.com. Supplements: l-Tyrosine. Accessed May 7, 2018. LINK:  https://examine.com/supplements/l-tyrosine/ Examine.com. Supplements: Noradrenaline. Accessed May 7, 2018. LINK:  https://examine.com/topics/noradrenaline/ Heijnen, S., Hommel, B., Kibele, A., & Colzato, L. S. (2015). Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 1890. http://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01890 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4703784/ Kim, T. W., Lim, B. V., Baek, D., Ryu, D.-S., & Seo, J. H. (2015). Stress-Induced Depression Is Alleviated by Aerobic Exercise Through Up-Regulation of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A Receptors in Rats. International Neurourology Journal, 19(1), 27–33. http://doi.org/10.5213/inj.2015.19.1.27 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4386483/ Mayo Clinic. Depression (Major Depressive Disorder). Accessed May 2, 2018. LINK:  https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/symptoms-causes/syc-20356007?p=1 Montoya, A., Bruins, R., Katzman, M. A., & Blier, P. (2016). The noradrenergic paradox: implications in the management of depression and anxiety. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 12, 541–557. http://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S91311 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4780187/ Morgan, W.P. (1969). A pilot investigation of physical working capacity in depressed and nondepressed psychiatric males. Res Q, 40(4):859-61. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5262123 Mul, J.D. (2018). Voluntary exercise and depression-like behavior in rodents: are we running in the right direction? J Mol Endocrinol, 60(3):R77-R95. doi: 10.1530/JME-17-0165. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29330149 LINK:  http://jme.endocrinology-journals.org/content/early/2018/01/12/JME-17-0165.full.pdf National Institutes of Health. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. What are the parts of the nervous system? Accessed May 2, 2018. LINK:  https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/neuro/conditioninfo/parts National Institutes of Health. National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Brain Basics: Know your brain. Accessed May 2, 2018. LINK:  https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Know-Your-Brain#Some%20Key%20Neurotransmitters%20at%20Work National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedLine Plus. Nerve conduction. Accessed May 2, 2018. LINK:  https://medlineplus.gov/ency/anatomyvideos/000089.htm Portugal, E.M.M., Cevada, T., Sobral Monteiro-Junior, R., Guimarães T.T., da Cruz Rubini, E., Lattari, E., Blois, C., & Camaz Deslandes, A. (2013). Neuroscience of exercise: from neurobiology mechanisms to mental health. Neuropsychobiology, 68(1):1-14. doi: 10.1159/000350946. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23774826 LINK:  https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/350946 Tada, A. (2017). The Associations among Psychological Distress, Coping Style, and Health Habits in Japanese Nursing Students: A Cross-Sectional Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14(11), 1434. http://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14111434 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5708073/ USDA. Nutrient Composition Database: Tryptophan. Accessed May 7, 2018. LINK:  https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/nutrients/report/nutrientsfrm?max=25&offset=0&totCount=0&nutrient1=501&nutrient2=&subset=0&sort=c&measureby=g Wipfli, B., Landers D, Nagoshi C, Ringenbach S. (2011). An examination of serotonin and psychological variables in the relationship between exercise and mental health. Scand J Med Sci Sports, 21(3):474-81. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2009.01049.x. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20030777/   ***NOTE: YOU GET 25% OFF WHEN YOU BUY FOUR ARTICLES***

‘Done for you’ pre-written blog post Instantly download the entire 2599 word post (29 refs) and upload to your website (Here is the introduction, subheadings, and references): The Microbiome-Gut-Brain Axis: What you need to know for brain and gut health Until recently, we didn’t know how much our gut and brain interacted. Some people thought that our brains controlled everything we did, consciously and subconsciously. They were wrong! Some of us have a sense that there is a connection because we often feel emotions in our gut. For example, when we’re scared we can get a “knot” in our stomach. Or, feeling sad or anxious can affect our appetite and the number of bathroom trips we need to make. Plus, many digestive issues often come with mood issues. Recent research confirms a gut-brain connection, a.k.a. “axis.” This microbiome-gut-brain axis is stronger and different than we had imagined. And with new technology, we’ve been able to study the gut microbes in a way that was not possible just a few years ago. Let’s talk about how your gut microbes, your gut itself, your brain, and your mental health are all interconnected and influence each other! Plus, we’ll dive into some “mood foods,” as well as stress reducing activities that can help with gut issues. The gut and microbiome ... The microbiome-gut-brain axis: The observations ... The microbiome-gut-brain axis: The nerve connections ... The microbiome-gut-brain axis: The biochemical connections ... The microbiome-gut-brain axis: The immune and inflammatory connections ... Mood foods ... What about probiotics? ... Reduce stress for your gut ... Conclusion There is a tonne of research digging into these vast and varied interconnections between our gut and our brain. The microbiome-gut-brain axis consists of nerves, biochemicals, and the immune system. This axis is a hotbed of research to try to really understand how our “second brain” affects our moods and vice versa. There are a number of foods that we can feed our gut that can help our moods, and reducing our stress can have a significant impact on several digestive diseases. The microbiota-gut-brain axis is an active area of research now. Make sure you treat your gut and your brain well. References Avetisyan, M., Schill, E. M., & Heuckeroth, R. O. (2015). Building a second brain in the bowel. The Journal of Clinical Investigation, 125(3), 899–907. http://doi.org/10.1172/JCI76307 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4362233/ Bonaz, B. (2013). Inflammatory bowel diseases: a dysfunction of brain-gut interactions? Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol, 59(3):241-59. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23867945 Bonaz, B., Bazin, T., & Pellissier, S. (2018). The Vagus Nerve at the Interface of the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 12, 49. http://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2018.00049 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5808284/ Brzozowski, B., Mazur-Bialy, A., Pajdo, R., Kwiecien, S., Bilski, J., Zwolinska-Wcislo, M., … Brzozowski, T. (2016). Mechanisms by which Stress Affects the Experimental and Clinical Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): Role of Brain-Gut Axis. Current Neuropharmacology, 14(8), 892–900. http://doi.org/10.2174/1570159X14666160404124127 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5333596/ Burokas, A., Moloney, R.D., Dinan, T.G. & Cryan, J.F. (2015). Microbiota regulation of the Mammalian gut-brain axis. Adv Appl Microbiol, 91:1-62. doi: 10.1016/bs.aambs.2015.02.001. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25911232 Carabotti, M., Scirocco, A., Maselli, M. A., & Severi, C. (2015). The gut-brain axis: interactions between enteric microbiota, central and enteric nervous systems. Annals of Gastroenterology : Quarterly Publication of the Hellenic Society of Gastroenterology, 28(2), 203–209. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4367209/ Dash, S. R., O’Neil, A., & Jacka, F. N. (2016). Diet and Common Mental Disorders: The Imperative to Translate Evidence into Action. Frontiers in Public Health, 4, 81. http://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2016.00081 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4850164/ Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2016). Mood by microbe: towards clinical translation. Genome Medicine, 8, 36. http://doi.org/10.1186/s13073-016-0292-1 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4822287/ Eriksson, E. M., Andrén, K. I., Kurlberg, G. K., & Eriksson, H. T. (2015). Aspects of the non-pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG, 21(40), 11439–11449. http://doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v21.i40.11439 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4616219/ Furness, J.B., Callaghan, B.P., Rivera, L.R. & Cho, H.J. (2014). The enteric nervous system and gastrointestinal innervation: integrated local and central control. Adv Exp Med Biol, 817:39-71. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-0897-4_3. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24997029 Gao, J., Xu, K., Liu, H., Liu, G., Bai, M., Peng, C., … Yin, Y. (2018). Impact of the Gut Microbiota on Intestinal Immunity Mediated by Tryptophan Metabolism. Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, 8, 13. http://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2018.00013 LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5808205/ Jiang, H., Ling, Z., Zhang, Y., Mao, H., Ma, Z., Yin, Y., Wang, W., Tang, W., Tan, Z., Shi, J., Li, L. & Ruan, B. (2015). Altered fecal microbiota composition in patients with major depressive disorder. Brain Behav Immun, 48:186-94. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2015.03.016. LINK:  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159115001105?via%3Dihub Johns Hopkins Medicine. The brain-gut connection. Accessed March 7, 2018. LINK:  http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/healthy_aging/healthy_body/the-brain-gut-connection Knight, R., Callewaert, C., Marotz, C., Hyde, E.R., Debelius, J.W., McDonald, D. & Sogin, M.L. (2017). The Microbiome and Human Biology. Annu Rev Genomics Hum Genet, 18:65-86. doi:10.1146/annurev-genom-083115-022438. LINK:  http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev-genom-083115-022438?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed LeBlanc, J. G., Chain, F., Martín, R., Bermúdez-Humarán, L. G., Courau, S., & Langella, P. (2017). Beneficial effects on host energy metabolism of short-chain fatty acids and vitamins produced by commensal and probiotic bacteria. Microbial Cell Factories, 16, 79. http://doi.org/10.1186/s12934-017-0691-z LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5423028/ Lerner, A., Neidhöfer, S., & Matthias, T. (2017). The Gut Microbiome Feelings of the Brain: A Perspective for Non-Microbiologists. Microorganisms, 5(4), 66. http://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms5040066  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5748575/ Ma, N., Guo, P., Zhang, J., He, T., Kim, S. W., Zhang, G., & Ma, X. (2018). Nutrients Mediate Intestinal Bacteria–Mucosal Immune Crosstalk. Frontiers in Immunology, 9, 5. http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2018.00005  LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5787545/ McKean, J., Naug, H., Nikbakht, E., Amiet, B. & Colson, N. (2017). Probiotics and Subclinical Psychological Symptoms in Healthy Participants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. J Altern Complement Med, 23(4):249-258. doi: 10.1089/acm.2016.0023. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27841940 Opie, R.S., O'Neil, A., Itsiopoulos, C. & Jacka, F.N. (2015). The impact of whole-of-diet interventions on depression and anxiety: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Public Health Nutr, 18(11):2074-93. doi: 10.1017/S1368980014002614. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25465596/ Pellissier, S. & Bonaz, B. (2017). The Place of Stress and Emotions in the Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Vitam Horm. 2017;103:327-354. doi: 10.1016/bs.vh.2016.09.005. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28061975 Pirbaglou, M., Katz, J., de Souza, R.J., Stearns, J.C., Motamed, M. & Ritvo, P. (2016). Probiotic supplementation can positively affect anxiety and depressive symptoms: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Nutr…

‘Done for you’ pre-written blog post Instantly download the entire 2636 word post (28 refs) and upload to your website (Here is the introduction, subheadings, and references): Omega-3s: the fats we love to love Omega-3s get a lot of notoriety - and for good reason! Not only is one of them essential for good health, but we don’t get enough of them in our diets. Omega-3s are a kind of fat. Fats are not just a storable source of 9 calories per gram. Different fats are used by our bodies for different essential functions. They’re part of the membranes that surround each cell, and are especially important in the brain and nerves. They can mediate the effect of our immune cells as well as influence the production of neurotransmitters and hormones. Omega-3s are anti-inflammatory, and have health benefits for the heart, brain, and our mental health. In fact, it’s thought that the reduced intake of omega-3s over the last few generations is one of the reasons for the increase in many of the chronic diseases we see today. Let’s look at what exactly omega-3s are, why they’re so good for our health, and how to get enough of these lovable fats. What are omega-3s? ... The health benefits of omega-3s There is a lot of research about the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. Things like anti-inflammation, heart and brain health, as well as better moods. Omega-3s and anti-inflammation ... Omega-3s and the brain ... Omega-3s and mental health ... Omega-3s and heart health ... How to get enough omega-3s from food ... Omega-3 supplements ... Conclusion Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for good health! Some of the health benefits include reduced inflammation and pain of rheumatoid arthritis; improved brain function and mental health; and reduced risk of heart disease. Flax is the best plant-based source of the essential omega-3, ALA. The two biologically active omega-3s, EPA and DHA, are from fish or algae. It’s always recommended to get your nutrients from food as much as possible. At least two servings of fatty fish each week is recommended. If you consider supplementing, make sure to follow direction on the label and keep them refrigerated. If you have any medical conditions or are taking medications, make sure to speak with your health care professional. References Abdulrazaq M1, Innes JK1, Calder PC2.(2017). Effect of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on arthritic pain: A systematic review. Nutrition, 39-40:57-66. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2016.12.003. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28606571 Bäck, M. (2017). Omega-3 fatty acids in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. Future Science OA, 3(4), FSO236. http://doi.org/10.4155/fsoa-2017-0067 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5674268/ Baker, E.J., Miles, E.A., Burdge, G.C., Yaqoob, P. & Calder, P.C. (2016). Metabolism and functional effects of plant-derived omega-3 fatty acids in humans. Prog Lipid Res, 64:30-56. doi: 10.1016/j.plipres.2016.07.002. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27496755 LINK: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/398743/1/__soton.ac.uk_ude_PersonalFiles_Users_lce_mydocuments_Eprints%2520-%2520Prof%2520Calder_Accepted%2520publications%2520for%2520eprints_Baker%2520et%2520al%2520%2520Final%2520Version%2520Revised.pdf Balk, E. M., & Lichtenstein, A. H. (2017). Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Summary of the 2016 Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence Review. Nutrients, 9(8), 865. http://doi.org/10.3390/nu9080865 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5579658/ Bègue, L., Zaalberg, A., Shankland, R., Duke, A., Jacquet, J., Kaliman, P., Pennel, L., Chanove, M., Arvers, P. & Bushman, B.J. (2017). Omega-3 supplements reduce self-reported physical aggression in healthy adults. Psychiatry Res, 261:307-311. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.12.038. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29331711 Bowen K.J., Harris, W.S. & Kris-Etherton, P.M. (2016). Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Are There Benefits? Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med, (11):69. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5067287/ Burckhardt, M., Herke, M., Wustmann, T., Watzke, S., Langer, G. & Fink A. (2016). Omega-3 fatty acids for the treatment of dementia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 11;4:CD009002. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009002.pub3. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27063583 LINK: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD009002.pub3/pdf Calder, P. C. (2013). Omega‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammatory processes: nutrition or pharmacology? British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 75(3), 645–662. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2012.04374.x LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3575932/ Calder P.C. (2017). Omega-3 fatty acids and inflammatory processes: from molecules to man. Biochem Soc Trans, 15;45(5):1105-1115. doi: 10.1042/BST20160474. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28900017 Carlson, S. E., & Colombo, J. (2016). Docosahexaenoic Acid and Arachidonic Acid Nutrition in Early Development. Advances in Pediatrics, 63(1), 453–471. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.yapd.2016.04.011 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5207030/ Chaddha, A & Eagle, K.A. (2015). Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Heart Health. Circulation, 132:e350-e352. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.015176 LINK: http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/132/22/e350.long Coorey, R., Novinda, A., Williams, H. & Jayasena, V. (2015). Omega-3 fatty acid profile of eggs from laying hens fed diets supplemented with chia, fish oil, and flaxseed. J Food Sci, 80(1):S180-7. doi: 10.1111/1750-3841.12735. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25557903 Gintya, A.T. & Conklinb, S.M. (2015). Short-term supplementation of acute long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may alter depression status and decrease symptomology among young adults with depression: A preliminary randomized and placebo controlled trial. Psychiatry Research. 229(1–2); 485–489. LINK: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165178115003844 Gioxari, A., Kaliora, A.C., Marantidou, F. & Panagiotakos, D.P. (2018). Intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrition, 45:114-124.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2017.06.023. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28965775 Health Canada, Natural and Nonprescription Health Products Directorate, Single Monographs, Fish Oil. Accessed March 2, 2018. LINK: http://webprod.hc-sc.gc.ca/nhpid-bdipsn/atReq.do?atid=fish.oil.huile.poisson&lang=eng Jayarathne, S., Koboziev, I., Park, O.-H., Oldewage-Theron, W., Shen, C.-L., & Moustaid-Moussa, N. (2017). 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‘Done for you’ pre-written blog post Instantly download the entire 2321 word post (32 refs) and upload to your website (Here is the introduction, subheadings, and references):   Inflammation, diabetes, heart disease, and excess body fat Diabetes and heart disease are on the rise worldwide. They’re serious chronic (long-term) conditions. They have a few other things in common as well. For one thing, they’re both considered “lifestyle” diseases. This means that they tend to occur in people with certain lifestyles (i.e. not-so-awesome nutrition and exercise habits, etc.). They’re also both linked with excess body fat, as well as inflammation. While there are several links and risk factors, today we’re going to talk specifically about inflammation. Then I’ll give you some tips how to improve your nutrition and lifestyle. NOTE: None of these are a substitute for professional medical advice. If you have any of these conditions, make sure you’re being monitored regularly by a licensed healthcare professional. Inflammation ... Types of inflammation - Acute vs. chronic ... What inflammation does ... Chronic inflammation and diabetes ... Chronic inflammation and heart disease ... Inflammation - Excess body fat ... Nutrition and lifestyle upgrades ... Anti-inflammatory diet ... Inflammation - Sugar and starch ... Inflammation - Dietary fat ... Inflammation - Dietary fibre ... Inflammation - Exercise ... Inflammation - Sleep ... Conclusion Diabetes and heart disease are serious conditions. They have a few things in common, namely excess body fat and increased levels of inflammation. Inflammation can be healthy if its fighting an infection or healing a wound, but chronic inflammation is associated with many serious conditions. There are a lot of nutrition and lifestyle issues that can contribute to chronic diseases. There are several ways they can do this; inflammation is just one of them. The good news is that there are are several nutrition and lifestyle factors you can improve. These include eating less sugars and starches, eating more fish, nuts and dietary fibre, and getting regular exercise and quality sleep. NOTE: None of these are a substitute for professional medical advice. If you have any of these conditions, make sure you’re being monitored regularly by a licensed healthcare professional. References: Alkhatib, A., Tsang, C., Tiss, A., Bahorun, T., Arefanian, H., Barake, R., Khadir, A. & Tuomilehto, J. (2017). Functional Foods and Lifestyle Approaches for Diabetes Prevention and Management. Nutrients. 9(12). pii: E1310. doi: 10.3390/nu9121310. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5748760/ Bäck, M. (2017). Omega-3 fatty acids in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. Future Science OA, 3(4), FSO236. http://doi.org/10.4155/fsoa-2017-0067 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5674268/ Bäck, M. & Hansson, G.K. (2015). Anti-inflammatory therapies for atherosclerosis. Nat Rev Cardiol. 12(4):199-211. doi: 10.1038/nrcardio.2015.5. Epub 2015 Feb 10. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25666404 Burke, M.F., Burke, F.M. & Soffer, D.E. (2017). Review of Cardiometabolic Effects of Prescription Omega-3 Fatty Acids. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 19(12):60. doi: 10.1007/s11883-017-0700-z. LINK: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11883-017-0700-z Calder, P.C. (2015). Marine omega-3 fatty acids and inflammatory processes: Effects, mechanisms and clinical relevance. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1851(4):469-84. doi: 10.1016/j.bbalip.2014.08.010. LINK: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1388198114001656?via%3Dihub Davison, K,M. & Temple, N.J. (2018). Cereal fiber, fruit fiber, and type 2 diabetes: Explaining the paradox. J Diabetes Complications. 32(2):240-245. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2017.11.002. LINK: http://www.jdcjournal.com/article/S1056-8727(17)30812-7/fulltext Drew, W., Wilson, D.V. & Sapey, E. (2017). Inflammation and neutrophil immunosenescence in health and disease: Targeted treatments to improve clinical outcomes in the elderly. Exp Gerontol. pii: S0531-5565(17)30841-0. doi: 10.1016/j.exger.2017.12.020. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29288715 Ellinger, S., & Stehle, P. (2016). Impact of Cocoa Consumption on Inflammation Processes—A Critical Review of Randomized Controlled Trials. Nutrients, 8(6), 321. http://doi.org/10.3390/nu8060321 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4924162/ Engin, A.B., Tsatsakis, A.M., Tsoukalas, D. & Engin, A. (2017). Do flavanols-rich natural products relieve obesity-related insulin resistance? Food Chem Toxicol. pii: S0278-6915(17)30803-7. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2017.12.055. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29288757 Examine.com. Fish Oil Supplements. Accessed January 12, 2018. LINK: https://examine.com/supplements/fish-oil/ Frasca, D., Blomberg, B.B. & Paganelli, R. (2017). Aging, Obesity, and Inflammatory Age-Related Diseases. Front Immunol. 8:1745. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2017.01745. eCollection 2017. LINK: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2017.01745/full Gutiérrez-Grijalva, E.P., Picos-Salas, M.A., Leyva-López, N., Criollo-Mendoza, M.S., Vazquez-Olivo, G. & Heredia, J.B. (2017). Flavonoids and Phenolic Acids from Oregano: Occurrence, Biological Activity and Health Benefits. Plants (Basel). 7(1). pii: E2. doi: 10.3390/plants7010002. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29278371 Haghighatdoost, F. & Nobakht, M.Gh.B.F. (2017). Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on blood inflammatory markers: a systematic review and meta-analysis on randomized controlled trials. Eur J Clin Nutr. doi: 10.1038/s41430-017-0048-z. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29288248 Iop, L., Dal Sasso, E., Schirone, L., Forte, M., Peruzzi, M., Cavarretta, E., … Frati, G. (2017). The Light and Shadow of Senescence and Inflammation in Cardiovascular Pathology and Regenerative Medicine. Mediators of Inflammation, 2017, 7953486. http://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7953486 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5651105/ Kim, Y., Keogh, J. B., & Clifton, P. M. (2017). Benefits of Nut Consumption on Insulin Resistance and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Multiple Potential Mechanisms of Actions. Nutrients, 9(11), 1271. http://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111271 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5707743/ Kolb, H. & Mandrup-Poulsen, T. (2010) The global diabetes epidemic as a consequence of lifestyle-induced low-grade inflammation. Diabetologia, 53:10. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-009-1573-7 LINK: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00125-009-1573-7 Libby, P. (2006). Inflammation and cardiovascular disease mechanisms. Am J Clin Nutr. 83(2):456S-460S. LINK: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/83/2/456S.long Lontchi-Yimagou E1, Sobngwi E, Matsha TE, Kengne AP. (2013). Diabetes mellitus and inflammation. Curr Diab Rep. 13(3):435-44. doi: 10.1007/s11892-013-0375-y. LINK: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11892-013-0375-y National Institutes of Health. National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute. Atherosclerosis. Accessed January 10, 2018. LINK: https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/atherosclerosis National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Diabetes. Accessed January 10, 2018. LINK: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance. Accessed January 10, 2018. LINK: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/what-is-diabetes/prediabetes-insulin-resistance Osei, K., & Gaillard, T. (2017). Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors in Blacks and Whites: Dissecting Racial Paradox of Metabolic Syndrome. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 8, 204. http://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2017.00204 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5583515/ Palomer, X., Pizarro-Delgado, J., Barroso, E. & Vázquez-Carrera, M. (2017). Palmitic and Oleic Acid: The Yin and Yang of Fatty Acids in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Trends Endocrinol Metab. pii: S1043-2760(17)30170-4. doi: 10.1016/j.tem.2017.11.009. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29290500 Poreba, M., Mostowik, M., Siniarski, A., Golebiowska-Wiatrak, R., Malinowski, K. P., Haberka, M., … Gajos, G. (2017). 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‘Done for you’ pre-written blog post Instantly download the entire 2388 word post (29 refs) and upload to your website (Here is the introduction, subheadings, and references):   Vitamin D: Are you getting enough?   Vitamin D is an essential fat-soluble vitamin. It’s sometimes called the “sunshine vitamin” because our skin makes it when exposed to the sun. It’s also the most common nutrient deficiency! Like most vitamins, vitamin D has many functions in the body. It’s mostly known for its ability to help build strong bones. But, vitamin D is also important for a healthy immune system, digestive system, heart and mental health, blood sugar regulation, fertility, and resistance to cancer. FUN FACT: Vitamin D is the vitamin with more scientific articles published since 2000 than any other vitamin. Let’s talk about the many roles vitamin D has in promoting good health. We’ll also go over the different forms of vitamin D and what exactly is a deficiency. Finally, I’ll give you three sources of this critical nutrient and how much we should get. Make sure you’re getting enough! Vitamin D in the body ... Vitamin D for bones ... Vitamin D, the immune system, and inflammation ... Vitamin D and digestive diseases ... Vitamin D and cancer ... Vitamin D and heart health ... Vitamin D and blood sugar ... Vitamin D for mental and brain health ... Vitamin D and fertility ... Forms of vitamin D ... Sources of vitamin D ... Sources of vitamin D - Sun exposure ... Sources of vitamin D - Foods ... Sources of vitamin D - Supplements ... Vitamin D deficiency ... How much vitamin D do we need? ... Summary ... References Berk, M., Williams, L. J., Jacka, F. N., O’Neil, A., Pasco, J. A., Moylan, S., … Maes, M. (2013). So depression is an inflammatory disease, but where does the inflammation come from? 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LINK: https://examine.com/supplements/Vitamin+D/ Farrokhyar F, Tabasinejad R, Dao D, Peterson D, Ayeni OR, Hadioonzadeh R, Bhandari M. Prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in athletes: a systematic-review and meta-analysis. Sports Med. 2015 Mar;45(3):365-78. doi: 10.1007/s40279-014-0267-6. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25277808 Fulgoni, V. L., Keast, D. R., Bailey, R. L., & Dwyer, J. (2011). Foods, Fortificants, and Supplements: Where Do Americans Get Their Nutrients? The Journal of Nutrition, 141(10), 1847–1854. http://doi.org/10.3945/jn.111.142257 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3174857/ Gittoes, N.J. (2015). Vitamin D--what is normal according to latest research and how should we deal with it? Clin Med (Lond). 15 Suppl 6:s54-7. doi: 10.7861/clinmedicine.15-6-s54. LINK: http://www.clinmed.rcpjournal.org/content/15/Suppl_6/s54.long Glade, M.J. (2013). Vitamin D: health panacea or false prophet? Nutrition. 29(1):37-41. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2012.05.010. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23085014/ Grace-Farfaglia, P. (2015). Bones of Contention: Bone Mineral Density Recovery in Celiac Disease—A Systematic Review. Nutrients, 7(5), 3347–3369. http://doi.org/10.3390/nu7053347 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4446755/ Haq, A., Svobodová, J., Imran, S. Stanford, C. & Razzaque, M.S. (2016). Vitamin D deficiency: A single centre analysis of patients from 136 countries. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 164, 209-213. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2016.02.007 LINK: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096007601630022X Health Canada. (2012). Do Canadian Adults Meet Their Nutrient Requirements Through Food Intake Alone? Cat. No.: H164-112/3-2012E-PDF ISBN: 978-1-100-20026-2 LINK: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/food-nutrition-surveillance/health-nutrition-surveys/canadian-community-health-survey-cchs/canadian-adults-meet-their-nutrient-requirements-through-food-intake-alone-health-canada-2012.html#a331 Kjærgaard, M., Waterloo, K., Wang, C.E., Almås, B., Figenschau, Y., Hutchinson, M.S., Svartberg, J. & Jorde, R. (2012). Effect of vitamin D supplement on depression scores in people with low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D: nested case-control study and randomised clinical trial. Br J Psychiatry. 201(5):360-8. LINK: http://bjp.rcpsych.org/content/201/5/360.long Kramer, C.K., Ye, C., Swaminathan, B., Hanley, A.J., Connelly, P.W., Sermer, M., Zinman, B. & Retnakaran, R. (2016). The persistence of maternal vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency during pregnancy and lactation irrespective of season and supplementation. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 84(5):680-6. doi: 10.1111/cen.12989. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641010 Meeker, S., Seamons, A., Maggio-Price, L., & Paik, J. (2016). Protective links between vitamin D, inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 22(3), 933–948. http://doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v22.i3.933 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4716046/ Narula, N. & Marshall, J.K. (2012). Management of inflammatory bowel disease with vitamin D: beyond bone health. J Crohns Colitis. 6(4):397-404. doi: 10.1016/j.crohns.2011.10.015. LINK: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1873-9946(11)00313-8 National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements, Vitamin D. Accessed Jan 29, 2018. LINK: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/ Pet, M.A. & Brouwer-Brolsma, E.M. (2016). The Impact of Maternal Vitamin ,D Status on Offspring Brain Development and Function: a Systematic Review. 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LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26110686 Ryan, J.W., Anderson, P.H., Turner, A.G. & Morris, H.A. (2013). Vitamin D activities and metabolic bone disease. Clin Chim Acta. 425:148-52. doi: 10.1016/j.cca.2013.07.024. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23911750 Schoenmakers, I., Gousias, P. Jones, K.S. & Prentice, A. (2016). Prediction of winter vitamin D status and requirements in the UK population based on 25(OH) vitamin D half-life and dietary intake data. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 164, 218-222. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2016.03.015 LINK: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960076016300619 Shang, M., & Sun, J. (2017). Vitamin D/VDR, probiotics, and gastrointestinal diseases. 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‘Done for you’ pre-written blog post Instantly download the entire 2434 word post (17 refs) and upload to your website (Here is the introduction, subheadings, and references):   Mental health, inflammation, and mood foods   Mental health issues have a huge impact on society. Some suggest that their impact is larger than any other chronic disease, including heart disease or diabetes. There are so many factors involved in complex conditions like mental health issues. Science is just starting to unravel one of these factors - inflammation. First, we’ll go over the many links between inflammation and mental health (there are a few). Then, we’ll talk about some exciting research into natural approaches - things like foods, nutrients, and lifestyle upgrades - and how these are related to better mental health. NOTE: None of these are a substitute for professional medical advice. If you have any of these conditions, make sure you’re being monitored regularly by a licensed healthcare professional. What is Inflammation? ... Inflammation and mental health ... Link 1 - Inflammation and mental health ... Link #2 - Inflammatory illnesses and mental health ... Link #3 - Inflammatory medications and mental health ... Link #4 - Inflammatory diets and mental health ... Foods and moods ... Better foods for better moods ... The SMILES trial ... Better nutrition for better moods ... B-vitamins such as B6, B9 (folic acid), and B12 ... Vitamin D ... Minerals (Calcium & Selenium) ... Omega-3s ... Better lifestyle for better moods ... Lifestyle factor #1 - Exercise ... Lifestyle factor #2 - Sleep ... Conclusion ... References: Berk, M., Williams, L. J., Jacka, F. N., O’Neil, A., Pasco, J. A., Moylan, S., … Maes, M. (2013). So depression is an inflammatory disease, but where does the inflammation come from? BMC Medicine, 11, 200. http://doi.org/10.1186/1741-7015-11-200 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3846682/ Dash, S. R., O’Neil, A., & Jacka, F. N. (2016). Diet and Common Mental Disorders: The Imperative to Translate Evidence into Action. Frontiers in Public Health, 4, 81. http://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2016.00081 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4850164/ Davison, K. M., Gondara, L., & Kaplan, B. J. (2017). Food Insecurity, Poor Diet Quality, and Suboptimal Intakes of Folate and Iron Are Independently Associated with Perceived Mental Health in Canadian Adults. Nutrients, 9(3), 274. http://doi.org/10.3390/nu9030274 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5372937/ Jacka, F. N. (2017). Nutritional Psychiatry: Where to Next? EBioMedicine, 17, 24–29. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.02.020 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5360575/ Jacka, F. N., O’Neil, A., Opie, R., Itsiopoulos, C., Cotton, S., Mohebbi, M., … Berk, M. (2017). A randomised controlled trial of dietary improvement for adults with major depression (the “SMILES” trial). BMC Medicine, 15, 23. http://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-017-0791-y LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5282719/ Krishnadas, R. & Cavanagh, J. (2012). Depression: an inflammatory illness? J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 83(5):495-502. doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2011-301779. LINK: http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/83/5/495.long Lucas, M., Chocano-Bedoya, P., Shulze, M. B., Mirzaei, F., O’Reilly, É. J., Okereke, O. I., … Ascherio, A. (2014). Inflammatory dietary pattern and risk of depression among women. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 36, 46–53. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2013.09.014 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3947176/ Mansur, R.B., Brietzke, E. & McIntyre, R.S. (2015). Is there a "metabolic-mood syndrome"? A review of the relationship between obesity and mood disorders. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 52:89-104. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2014.12.017. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579847/ Meegan, A. P., Perry, I. J., & Phillips, C. M. (2017). The Association between Dietary Quality and Dietary Guideline Adherence with Mental Health Outcomes in Adults: A Cross-Sectional Analysis. Nutrients, 9(3), 238. http://doi.org/10.3390/nu9030238 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5372901/ Opie, R.S., O'Neil, A., Jacka, F.N., Pizzinga, J. & Itsiopoulos, C. (2017). A modified Mediterranean dietary intervention for adults with major depression: Dietary protocol and feasibility data from the SMILES trial. Nutr Neurosci. 2017 Apr 19:1-15. doi: 10.1080/1028415X.2017.1312841. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28424045 Raison, C. L., Borisov, A. S., Majer, M., Drake, D. F., Pagnoni, G., Woolwine, B. J., … Miller, A. H. (2009). Activation of CNS Inflammatory Pathways by Interferon-alpha: Relationship to Monoamines and Depression. Biological Psychiatry, 65(4), 296–303. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2008.08.010 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2655138/ Roca, M., Kohls, E., Gili, M., Watkins, E., Owens, M., Hegerl, U., … on behalf of the MooDFOOD Prevention Trial Investigators. (2016). Prevention of depression through nutritional strategies in high-risk persons: rationale and design of the MooDFOOD prevention trial. BMC Psychiatry, 16, 192. http://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-016-0900-z LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4898322/ Rosenblat, J. D. & McIntyre, R. S. (2017). Bipolar Disorder and Immune Dysfunction: Epidemiological Findings, Proposed Pathophysiology and Clinical Implications. Brain Sciences, 7(11), 144. http://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7110144 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5704151/ Smith, R.S. (1991). The macrophage theory of depression. Med Hypotheses. (4):298-306. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1943879/ Strawbridge, R., Young, A. H., & Cleare, A. J. (2017). Biomarkers for depression: recent insights, current challenges and future prospects. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 13, 1245–1262. http://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S114542 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5436791/ Subramaniapillai, M., Carmona, N. E., Rong, C., & McIntyre, R. S. (2017). Inflammation: opportunities for treatment stratification among individuals diagnosed with mood disorders. Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience, 19(1), 27–36. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5442361/ Wikipedia. Inflammation (definition). Accessed Jan 9, 2018. LINK: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inflammation   ***NOTE: YOU GET 25% OFF WHEN YOU BUY FOUR ARTICLES***

‘Done for you’ pre-written blog post Instantly download the entire 2538 word post (22 refs) and upload to your website (Here is the introduction, subheadings, and references):   Beautiful skin with hyaluronic acid   Did you know that back in medieval France, King Henry II’s wife, Princess Catherine, believed that if she ate chicken combs she would become beautiful? Even before that (in the 700s) Yang Guifei, one of the four beauties of ancient China, also ate chicken combs. Chicken combs, as it turns out, contain a lot of a substance known as hyaluronic acid. Recent clinical studies show that ingesting hyaluronic acid actually can increase the moisture content of the skin. This shows up as more hydrated, and “beautiful” younger-looking skin. Nowadays, hyaluronic acid is not just made from chicken combs, but also from microbial fermentation. It’s found in many skin supplements. It’s also used as an injectable filler to reduce wrinkles. Let’s dive into how this ancient beauty enhancer actually works. Hyaluronic acid in the “matrix” ... Hyaluronic acid in the skin ... Aging and wounded skin ... Collagen and hyaluronic acid supplements ... Skin benefits from ingesting hyaluronic acid (as a food and supplement) ... Skin benefits from supplementing with hyaluronic acid and collagen ... Skin benefits from other supplements that increase hyaluronic acid ... How ingested hyaluronic acid helps the skin ... Summary ... Amado, I.R., Vázquez, J.A., Pastrana, L. & Teixeira, J.A. (2016). Cheese whey: A cost-effective alternative for hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Food Chem. 2016 May 1;198:54-61. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.11.062. LINK: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814615302077?via%3Dihub Aguirre, A., Gil-Quintana, E., Fenaux, M., Erdozain, S. & Sarria, I. (2017). Beneficial Effects of Oral Supplementation With Ovoderm on Human Skin Physiology: Two Pilot Studies. J Diet Suppl, 14(6):706-714. doi: 10.1080/19390211.2017.1310781. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28429999 Examine.com. Type II Collagen. Accessed 2017Oct10. LINK: https://examine.com/supplements/type-ii-collagen/ Fisher, G.J., Datta, S., Wang, Z., Li, X.-Y., Quan, T., Chung, J.H., … Voorhees, J.J. (2000). c-Jun–dependent inhibition of cutaneous procollagen transcription following ultraviolet irradiation is reversed by all-trans retinoic acid. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 106(5), 663–670. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC381286/ Frantz, C., Stewart, K.M. & Weaver, V.M. (2010). The extracellular matrix at a glance. J Cell Sci, 123: 4195-4200; doi: 10.1242/jcs.023820 LINK: http://jcs.biologists.org/content/123/24/4195.full Hussain, A., Zia, K.M., Tabasum, S., Noreen, A., Ali, M., Iqbal, R. & Zuber, M. (2017). Blends and composites of exopolysaccharides; properties and applications: A review. Int J Biol Macromol, 94(Pt A):10-27. doi: 10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2016.09.104. LINK: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014181301631234X?via%3Dihub Kavasi, R.M., Berdiaki, A., Spyridaki, I., Corsini, E., Tsatsakis, A., Tzanakakis, G. & Nikitovic, D. (2017). HA metabolism in skin homeostasis and inflammatory disease. Food Chem Toxicol, 101:128-138. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2017.01.012. LINK: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278691517300200?via%3Dihub Kawada, C., Yoshida, T., Yoshida, H., Matsuoka, R., Sakamoto, W., Odanaka, W., … Urushibata, O. (2014). Ingested hyaluronan moisturizes dry skin. Nutrition Journal, 13, 70. http://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-13-70 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25014997 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4110621/ Kimura, M., Maeshima, T., Kubota, T., Kurihara, H., Masuda, Y. & Nomura, Y. (2016). Absorption of Orally Administered Hyaluronan. J Med Food, 9(12):1172-1179. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27982756 Lee, D.H., Oh, J.H. & Chung J.H. (2016). Glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan in skin aging. Journal of Dermatological Science, 83(3):174-181. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27378089 LINK: http://www.jdsjournal.com/article/S0923-1811(16)30117-7/fulltext Maccari, F., Mantovani, V., Gabrielli, O., Carlucci, A., Zampini, L., Galeazzi, T., Galeotti, F., Coppa, G.V. & Volpi, N. (2016). Metabolic fate of milk glycosaminoglycans in breastfed and formula fed newborns. Glycoconj J. 2016 Apr;33(2):181-8. doi: 10.1007/s10719-016-9655-5. LINK: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10719-016-9655-5 MacKay, D. & Miller, A.L. (2003). Nutritional support for wound healing. Altern Med Rev, 8(4):359-77. LINK: http://www.altmedrev.com/publications/8/4/359.pdf Marini, A., Grether-Beck, S., Jaenicke, T., Weber, M., Burki, C., Formann, P., Brenden, H., Schönlau, F. & Krutmann, J. (2012). Pycnogenol® effects on skin elasticity and hydration coincide with increased gene expressions of collagen type I and hyaluronic acid synthase in women. Skin Pharmacol Physiol, 25(2):86-92. doi: 10.1159/000335261. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22270036 LINK: https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/335261# Maytin, E.V. (2016). Hyaluronan: More than just a wrinkle filler. Glycobiology, 26(6), 553–559. http://doi.org/10.1093/glycob/cww033 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26964566 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4847620/ Oesser, S., Adam, M., Babel, W. & Seifert J. (1999). Oral administration of (14)C labeled gelatin hydrolysate leads to an accumulation of radioactivity in cartilage of mice (C57/BL). Journal of Nutrition, 129(10):1891-1895. LINK: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/129/10/1891.long Oh, J.H., Kim, Y.K., Jung, J.Y., Shin, J.E., Kim, K.H., Cho, K.H., Eun, H.C. & Chung, J.H. (2011). Intrinsic aging- and photoaging-dependent level changes of glycosaminoglycans and their correlation with water content in human skin. J Dermatol Sci, 62(3):192-201. doi: 10.1016/j.jdermsci.2011.02.007 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21477996 Oishi, Y., Fu, Z.W., Ohnuki, Y., Kato, H. & Noguchi, T. (2002). Molecular basis of the alteration in skin collagen metabolism in response to in vivo dexamethasone treatment: effects on the synthesis of collagen type I and III, collagenase, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Br J Dermatol, 147(5):859-68. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12410694 Pan, N.C., Pereira, H.C.B., da Silva, M.L.C., Vasconcelos, A.F.D. & Celligoi, M.A.P.C. (2017). Improvement Production of Hyaluronic Acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus in Sugarcane Molasses. Appl Biochem Biotechnol, 182(1):276-293. doi: 10.1007/s12010-016-2326-y. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27900664 Papakonstantinou, E., Roth, M., & Karakiulakis, G. (2012). Hyaluronic acid: A key molecule in skin aging. Dermato-Endocrinology, 4(3), 253–258. http://doi.org/10.4161/derm.21923 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3583886/ Schwartz, S.R. & Park, J. (2012). Ingestion of BioCell Collagen(®), a novel hydrolyzed chicken sternal cartilage extract; enhanced blood microcirculation and reduced facial aging signs. Clin Interv Aging, 7: 267–273. doi: 10.2147/CIA.S32836 LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3426261/ Song, S., Yu, Q., Zhang, B., Ai, C., Sun, Y., Fu, Y., Zhao, M. & Wen, C. (2017). Quantification and comparison of acidic polysaccharides in edible fish intestines and livers using HPLC-MS/MS. Glycoconj J. doi: 10.1007/s10719-017-9783-6. LINK: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10719-017-9783-6 Tanaka, M., Misawa, E., Yamauchi, K., Abe, F. & Ishizaki, C. (2015). Effects of plant sterols derived from Aloe vera gel on human dermal fibroblasts in vitro and on skin condition in Japanese women. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol, 20(8):95-104. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S75441. eCollection 2015. LINK: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4345938/   ***NOTE: YOU GET 25% OFF WHEN YOU BUY FOUR ARTICLES***